Buffalo Soldiers

February 2 – 15, 2019. In a prior post, I wondered why a canyon in Texas would be named after a Florida Indian tribe. Seminole Canyon State Park & Historic Site was named after the Seminole, the only tribe never to surrender to the U.S. government. But this canyon is named for a specific group …read more

“Vannymoon”

November 19 – December 7, 2019. “What’s that grinding noise?!” It was just a signal telling us that the “vannymoon” was over. Our vannymoon lasted three years and almost 65K miles. But it definitely ended on Tuesday 11/19/2019. We had been on the move, visiting friends and family, and were looking forward to camping in …read more

New Mexico Part 2

May 3 – May 13, 2019 – (This post is from our travels this past May). Our last travel post covered the beginning of our time in New Mexico, with visits to Earthships, the Rio Grande Gorge. Santa Fe, and Los Alamos. In this post, we visit Albuquerque, El Malpaís, Fort Stanton, and Roswell. Albuquerque …read more

Ancestral Pueblos

April 24, 27, 28, & May 1, 2019. Last spring we visited Mesa Verde National Park, and Bandelier and Navajo National Monuments. These sites contain prehistoric dwellings of the ancestral Pueblo peoples. I’m combining the three sites into one post. The desert area surrounding Four Corners, where Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona meet, is …read more

Surreal Jungle

February 28 – March 2, 2019. After WWI artists and writers in the Surrealist movement sought to break with rationalism and unlock the powers of the unconscious mind. Their movement lasted until after WWII, influencing western thought and politics. Here in Xilitla, in the jungle of San Luis Potisí, works of two Surrealist artists can …read more

Into the Sierra Gorda

February 26 – 28, 2019. Sierra Gorda is a 95 square mile biosphere reserve spreading into four Mexican states. The terrain here is rugged. There are many waterfalls. And there are caves from which thousands of birds leave in the mornings, and return at night. We planned to visit waterfalls and caves, but the weather …read more

Morelia

February 9 – 11, 2019. It’s pronounced Mow-RAY-Lee-Aah instead of having the expected emphasis on the Lee syllable. Why, because it’s named for Mexico’s beloved revolutionary Morelos (Mow-RAY-lows). Remember when we climbed up into his fist? The birth home of Jose María Morelos is here. It is now a museum that contains some of his …read more

La Reserva de la Biosfera Tehuacán-Cuicatlán

January 20 – 24, 2019. Remember Minerva? In addition to helping establish the Joshua Tree and Anzo-Borrego reserves in the US, she worked with Mexican president Rubio in 1931 to establish a 10K acre preserve near Tehuacán. Now the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán biosphere has expanded to a 1,800 square mile UNESCO World Heritage site (one of Mexico’s …read more

Cuidad de México Prehispánico

January 2 – January 9, 2019. I’ve been feeling a bit jealous. In the US there were concerted efforts to erase the traces and culture of indigenous populations. Some of my ancestors may have been part of these efforts. But here in Mexico descendants of the peoples conquered by the Spaniards are surrounded by ancient …read more

Jardín Botánico Culiacán

December 8, 2018. In our last post we were tooling down the Mexican mainland coast of the Sea of Cortez. We took a break from the beaches to head inland from Topolobampo to Culiacán, where we wanted to see the Botanical Gardens. After spending a night in the Tres Rios hotel parking lot, we visited …read more